Laurel Office 
14435 Cherry Lane Court Suite 100
Laurel, MD 20707
(301) 776-3665
Hours: Mon–Thurs: 7am to 8pm
Friday - 7am to 4pm

Odenton Office
1360 Blair Drive Suite D 
Odenton, MD 21113
(410) 672-8970
Hours: Mon – Thurs: 7am to 8pm
Friday - 7am to 5pm
Columbia Office
5999 Harper's Farm Road, Suite W100 
Columbia, MD 21144
More Info Coming Soon

Elbow

The elbow is one of the more stable joints in the body and consists of the intersection of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), and the radius and ulna (paired bones in the forearm). The elbow joint allows for bending/straightening (flexion/extension) of the arm, and for twisting (supination/pronation) of the forearm. Because of its location between the shoulder and the wrist, many elbow injuries occur as overuse injuries and may be related to concurrent shoulder/wrist problems.

Our elbow pain treatment program will be tailored to your specific needs and will include the following:

  • A pain relief program and patient education on the elbow (including its anatomy, risk factors for pain, and ways to manage pain in the short term at home)
  • Development of home treatment program
  • Manual therapy to normalize range of motion and muscle tone
  • Exercise to improve movement and strength

Some common conditions of the elbow:

Fracture/dislocation: is caused by trauma and requires immediate emergency medical attention. Once the elbow has been set, the doctor will likely recommend a period of immobilization followed by physical therapy to address the loss of motion and strength.

Ulnar nerve injuries: occur when the ulnar nerve (runs along the inside of the arm and around the back of the inner elbow) is stretched, pinched, or compressed/subjected to blunt force (“hitting your funny bone”). Often ulnar nerve injuries are common with repetitive motions, such as overhead throwing (baseball), or the use of hand tools repeatedly for years (mechanic, plumber).

Symptoms may include:

  • tingling and numbness in the ring and pinky fingers
  • pain running along the inside of the elbow/forearm
  • significant tenderness along the inside of the elbow (unable to lean on the elbow)
  • aching sensation with prolonged flexion (bending) of the elbow

Medial epicondylitis (Golfer’s elbow): is the term for tendonitis of the common flexor tendon of the forearm muscles. This tendon attaches to the inside (medial side) of the elbow and allows for wrist and finger flexion (curling/closing). Medial epicondylitis is caused by overuse and activity modification and bracing may help.

Symptoms may include:

  • pain along the inner elbow that aches at rest and is sharp with wrist and hand movement
  • tenderness to the touch along the underside of the forearm (close to the elbow)
  • weakness of the forearm/hand

Lateral epicondylitis (Tennis elbow): is the term for tendonitis of the common extensor tendon of the forearm muscles. This tendon attaches on the outside (lateral side) of the elbow and allows for wrist and finger extension (opening). Lateral epicondylitis is caused by overuse, especially with a clenched first, and activity modification and bracing may help.

Symptoms may include:

  • pain along the outer elbow that aches at rest and is sharp with wrist and hand movement
  • tenderness to the touch along the outside of the elbow/top of the forearm
  • weakness of the forearm/hand

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